Life is What Happens While You Are Making Plans

"The problem with life is that there is little or no time for practice."
LIWHWYAMP is a compilation of things I find interesting or am passionate about. Which pretty much boils down to fairness for all people, architecture, science, cinema and animals - at least, judging by my postings.
thesilverpaws:

"Aha, aha. Mhm. So, what else is troubling you today? Please go on."
— Faolan giving me therapeutic sessions on the couch

thesilverpaws:

"Aha, aha. Mhm. So, what else is troubling you today? Please go on."

— Faolan giving me therapeutic sessions on the couch

(via mostlycatsmostly)

libutron:

We see it blue, but how is it seen by his fellows? - Some facts about avian vision
No way to know really. Although we tend to be somewhat self-satisfied with our own color vision, it is not particularly well developed when compared with that of most vertebrates. The color vision of most humans relies on three types of retinal cone photoreceptors, all of them neurally integrated in the assessment of spectral radiances and thus in the perception of color, our colors are mapped in three-dimensional color space (we are “trichromatic”).
In contrast, most birds have four types of cone involved in their color vision and are likely to be tetrachromatic. The consequence of four cone pigments, and tetrachromacy in particular, is that birds see the world differently from humans and in a way for which it is hard to compensate because we simply lack the neural machinery.
There are also other additional physiological differences that limit our appreciation of a bird’s view of the world. First, most of the retinal cones of birds contain oil droplets with high carotenoid content that act as spectral filters and modify the spectral sensitivities of the cones. Second, birds are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, whereas humans are not.
The differences between human and avian vision mean that, for many purposes, human vision, or standards derived from human psychophysics, are inappropriate for studying bird visual behavior.
In the case of the ‘bluest’ birds, those that have the highest percentage of blue feathers on the body, such as the Black-naped Monarch (Hypothymis azurea), it is known that these ornamental feathers reflect light maximally at the shortest wavelengths (UV), with the greatest intensity and the greatest contrast. 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Henry Koh | Locality: Kaen Krachan National Park, Thailand (2013)

As a recovering neurobiologist this way cool, but as a recovering neurobiologist he looks like a blue Bert to me.

libutron:

We see it blue, but how is it seen by his fellows? - Some facts about avian vision

No way to know really. Although we tend to be somewhat self-satisfied with our own color vision, it is not particularly well developed when compared with that of most vertebrates. The color vision of most humans relies on three types of retinal cone photoreceptors, all of them neurally integrated in the assessment of spectral radiances and thus in the perception of color, our colors are mapped in three-dimensional color space (we are “trichromatic”).

In contrast, most birds have four types of cone involved in their color vision and are likely to be tetrachromatic. The consequence of four cone pigments, and tetrachromacy in particular, is that birds see the world differently from humans and in a way for which it is hard to compensate because we simply lack the neural machinery.

There are also other additional physiological differences that limit our appreciation of a bird’s view of the world. First, most of the retinal cones of birds contain oil droplets with high carotenoid content that act as spectral filters and modify the spectral sensitivities of the cones. Second, birds are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, whereas humans are not.

The differences between human and avian vision mean that, for many purposes, human vision, or standards derived from human psychophysics, are inappropriate for studying bird visual behavior.

In the case of the ‘bluest’ birds, those that have the highest percentage of blue feathers on the body, such as the Black-naped Monarch (Hypothymis azurea), it is known that these ornamental feathers reflect light maximally at the shortest wavelengths (UV), with the greatest intensity and the greatest contrast. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Henry Koh | Locality: Kaen Krachan National Park, Thailand (2013)

As a recovering neurobiologist this way cool, but as a recovering neurobiologist he looks like a blue Bert to me.

(via rhamphotheca)

Modest Mouse

—Edit the Sad Parts

path-unknown:

Sometimes all I really want to feel is love
Sometimes I’m angry that I feel so angry
Sometimes my feelings get in the way
Of what I really feel I needed to say

(via keepelpasodead)

mostlycatsmostly:

Mr. Junebug and his magnificent tail.
(submitted by @MikeInOly)

mostlycatsmostly:

Mr. Junebug and his magnificent tail.

(submitted by @MikeInOly)

humansofnewyork:

Had a 24 hour stopover in Kathmandu, Nepal, where I visited the Pashupatinath Hindu Temple. The temple is popular with tourists, and the resident priests have become experts at ‘casually’ positioning themselves in oh-so-photographical arrangements. They then collect donations in exchange for ‘authentic’ photographs. Motives aside, they do a beautiful job, and the scenes they create seem worthy of a Hollywood art director. 
(Kathmandu, Nepal)

humansofnewyork:

Had a 24 hour stopover in Kathmandu, Nepal, where I visited the Pashupatinath Hindu Temple. The temple is popular with tourists, and the resident priests have become experts at ‘casually’ positioning themselves in oh-so-photographical arrangements. They then collect donations in exchange for ‘authentic’ photographs. Motives aside, they do a beautiful job, and the scenes they create seem worthy of a Hollywood art director. 

(Kathmandu, Nepal)

politicalprof:

Politicalprof has been in a meeting all day. No epiphanies epiphinated.

politicalprof:

Politicalprof has been in a meeting all day. No epiphanies epiphinated.

creativehouses:

Huge Open Kitchen

The kitchen is a bit over the top for me, but the ceiling and walls are appealing.

creativehouses:

Huge Open Kitchen

The kitchen is a bit over the top for me, but the ceiling and walls are appealing.